I lost count after two…

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Name:The seven messages of highly effective reading teachers
Date: 11/5/14
Author: Brian Cambourne
Key Ideas:
  • ‘tangled tots’ are children that “had tangled the teaching in a web of distorted learning which blocked school progress” Cambourne doesn’t believe this.
  • Children should be taught key skills for reading that will help them later in life
  • If they do not enjoy reading, it will be harder for them to learn
  • You need to draw on all sources of information in a text, like the way it sounds, the way it looks, how it is set out etc.
  • Self-correction is key
  • You must know how you are reading, see the words in your head if reading them silently.
Language Features: Semantics, lexical choice, semantic patterning, Syntax, phrases, sentence structures (little bit of discourse)
Course Aspects: Unit 3 - AoS 2: Formal Language - Establishing expertise, reinforcing social distance and authority
Personal Opinion: I believe that teaching kids these 7 messages will be useful for helping them later in life, especially message 1 “A reader’s major focus should always be meaning” is the most important message a child should learn. It sets up the basis for the rest of their lives reading, as if there is no meaning to the words, they will not make sense. Children don’t understand if something makes sense or not at that age, so if they are taught then they can learn how to read AND write easier later on in life. I also don’t think that children with no condition to affect their ability to learn would block school progress if they weren’t learning.
“Quotes”:
  • “such children “had tangled the teaching in a web of distorted learning which blocked school progress”.”
  • “A reader’s major focus should always be meaning”
  • “Effective readers draw on all sources of information in the text”
  • “Effective readers are always predicting”
  • “Effective readers self-correct”
  • “Effective readers have a range of strategies”
  • “Effective readers know how they read”
  • “Effective readers love reading”
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grammer nazis no nothing

Click here for the Article.

Name: Are 'grammar Nazis' ruining the English Language
Date: 19/3/14
Author: Tom Chivers

Key Ideas: 

  • When language changes, it’s not for the worse
  • Language is constantly changing, and it is shown by new dialects forming.
  • The rules of any language are only defined by by how people use that language
Language Features: Prescriptivism & Descriptivism
Course Aspects: Unit 3 - AoS 2: Formal Language - use of formal language - reinforcing social distance and authority

Personal Opinion: I think that the word Nazi shouldn’t have been used at all in this article. Nazi’s were not erratic or wild, they did not randomly get angry at people. (I think capricious is the word I’m looking for) They followed orders and that was it. In regards to the article itself, I believe that rules in the English language shouldn’t apply to every conversation either online or in person, as not everyone has the knowledge or access to the knowledge of words and how they’re spoken as other more privileged people.
“Quotes”: 

  • Despite what many people think, the rules of a language – any language – are only defined by how people use that language
  • Another myth is that the word “none” is always singular, even though it’s been used since the 1640s and the plural version was the more common form for 300 years.
  • Dialects are proof that language changes. But it doesn’t change as fast as people think. “The changes you get over a century are trivial,” says Pullum, because there’s a long history of literacy and a large body of users, both of which keep it stable.
  • Never keep a dark-coloured sofa in the same house as Dalmatians, because they’ll negotiate their own rules about whether they’re allowed to use it, and they won’t necessarily be your rules. See how similar to grammar that is?